Off to Market

On sale now through Smashwords and Amazon for $1.99, New Arbor Day, j.s.clark’s debut speculative novel. Coming soon in paperback through Lulu POD! 

Agee Skyler thought the biggest problem on his roadtrip were the words he hadn’t said to Caitlin Moss, but four cars piled like crumpled pop cans against a rolled semi with no survivors, no witnesses, no skid marks, and no first responders is just the edge of an attack even a Marine wasn’t ready for.

Meanwhile, time is running out for Caitlin in a darkened New York City under siege, and threatened from within by refugees growing more desperate as the buildings fall.

Can Agee, Caitlin, and three uncanny strangers find common purpose long enough to save the human race from total destruction?

Reader advisory: this novel contains mature elements.

 

 

Free through Smashwords and $.99 through Amazon!

Life is tough when you’re a fourteen year old girl. It’s even tougher when a quick joyride in your mom’s spaceship leaves you stranded light-years from home. But with the help of a well connected space Lord, Aiyela might have a big push in the right direction. If only she only she can land a job, land her ship without exploding, and generally not embarrass herself.

 

 

 

 On sale now, $.99 at Smashwords!

After meeting lord Yasha, life was starting to look bright when Aiyela decided to take a shortcut on a cargo run trying.

The next thing she knows she’s being chased by a Frankensteinian ship, and falling into the hands of a blood-thirsty pirate captain! Between her wits and her shiny new All-Tool, she might make it out alive.

If her mouth doesn’t do her in first.

 

 

Available December 5th, 2012. Free or “Set Your Own Price” on Smashwords., $.99 Amazon Kindle, and Lulu (Hardback/Softback, at cost if direct; at a markup if through Amazon).

Jesus was a Hebrew. He went to the Temple, often; he called it His Father’s house. He went to synagogue on the Sabbath. He made it a point to attend the feasts, even when people were waiting there to kill him. He argued doctrine from Moses, the Prophets, and the Writings. He said the Shema (“the LORD our God, the LORD is one”). He recognized God as the “One” of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.

So why is Christianity separate from Judaism? Why don’t Jews see Christianity as one of their sects? Was it because the Jews rejected their Messiah? Wasn’t the first wave of disciples Jewish? How was Jesus able to win thousands of Jews in the shadow of the Temple, under the noses of the Pharisees and Sadducees? How was it that the largest mass conversion seen by the Apostles happened to Jewish audiences, inJerusalem, on a Holy Day?

Perhaps the question should be, how is it that the Messiah and His followers could worship alongside their kindred within the Temple and Synagogues where the great prophet Moses, giver of the law, was revered?

Does the answer come back to a single page in the last third of our Bible? A page that keeps Jesus safe from Moses? The law from grace? Was this a division started by the Apostles? Was it deepened by the Apostle Paul? How is that we now see Moses and Paul as antithetical to each other? The law of Moses was the standard that God’s people lived by for centuries, the standard that God cited for His judgment when He desolated the land of Israel with the armies of pagan kings, why does our proof-text for disregarding that law come primarily from a single, New Testament writer? Why not Isaiah or Jeremiah? Does it seem odd that the argument for a massive shift away from thousands of years of understanding comes after the fact? In the last 33% of scripture and not from the first 67% that was actually cited by The Messiah in His ministry as the basis for His doctrine?

Backwards explores these questions and shows how the answer comes through understanding scripture as a single story by a God who reveals the end in the beginning. A story where every loose end is tied up, and every promise fulfilled.

 

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